NATIONAL NURSING WEEK

 

May 9-15, 2022: The National Nursing Week annual celebrations take place from the Monday to the Sunday of the same week as Florence Nightingale’s birthday, May 12.

In 1971, ICN designated May 12, the birthday of nursing pioneer Florence Nightingale, as International Nurses Day. In 1985, CNA members passed a resolution to begin negotiations with the federal government to have the week containing May 12 proclaimed as National Nurses Week annually. Soon after, the federal minister of health proclaimed the second week of May as National Nurses Week. In 1993, the name was changed to National Nursing Week to emphasize the profession’s accomplishments as a discipline.

The theme this year is #WeAnswerTheCall and was developed by CNA to highlight the many roles that nurses play in a patient’s health-care journey. The pandemic brought to light the courage and commitment that nurses work under every day and showed the significant role that nurses play in the community. This year, Johnson and Johnson, the world’s largest and most broadly-based health-care company, has sponsored National Nursing Week to showcase its commitment to the well-being of Canada’s health-care professionals.

(From National Nursing Week 2022- Canadian Nurses Association)

In the Shadow of Historiography : Toward Another History of Healthcare

Annual Meeting of CAHN University of Ottawa 9th-11th June 2022

The history of healthcare was for a long time devoted only to the history of doctors and their inventions and theories. It was not until the 1970s that a history of health emerged that at first focused on other caregivers, professional or not, then on patients and others, and finally, at the beginning of the 21st century, it took in all the rest that had been forgotten.  Thus it is only recently that a number of actors in the healthcare field have taken their legitimate place in the historiography.  And the work is still far from being completed.

Many areas needing more investigation are those of women, racialized and indigenous peoples, non-orthodox caregivers, people suffering from physical or psychiatric ailments, and others who have not found their rightful place in the history of healthcare. The history of nursing is particularly representative of this gap in the historiography. Long centred on prominent figures in nursing such as Jeanne Mance, Florence Nightingale, Mary Agnes Snively or Léonie Chaptal, it is now opening up to critiquing these illustrious figures as well as including others in nursing who have until now been ignored, purposefully or not.

It is within this context of historiographic revitalization, which takes in the history of nursing but which also includes the wider history of health – an area of research that is itself more inclusive and interdisciplinary ‒ that we wish to call for submissions for the next annual meeting of the Canadian Association for the History of Nursing. We are inviting therefore all researchers, whatever their primary field of study, who are interested in a fresh look at the history of healthcare through exploring uncharted territory or using unexpected approaches, to submit a proposal. The aim is to support novel research in the history of nursing and the history of health more broadly by inviting the exploration and development of new avenues, approaches, and methods, as well as bringing to light the voices of those who have been silenced until now.

In short, at this meeting that is interdisciplinary and open to all, we hope to delve into the shadow of historiography of healthcare to bring justice to those who in the past have contributed so much to the support, health, or simply the comfort of the suffering and the vulnerable.

The proposals, which should contain a title, an abstract of a maximum of 500 words, and a short biography of the authors, should be submitted to nhru@uottawa.ca before 31 December 2021.

 Note that communications could be done in person or by videoconference.

Fort St. John new elementary school named after pioneer nurse Anne Roberts Young

School District 60 received more than 70 public submissions about a name for Fort St. John’s new elementary school, and pioneer nurse Anne Roberts Young was top among the suggestions. Roberts was the first registered nurse stationed in the North Peace, arriving from England in 1930 to work at the Grand Haven Red Cross Outpost Hospital.

She married farmer and postmaster Jim Young of Rose Prairie and continued working as a nurse after her move to that community, often travelling by horseback and through severe weather to see patients. She delivered more than 300 babies during her 25-year career in the region.

To celebrate the opening of the School the Fort St. John North Peace Museum mounted a display of items from Young’s nursing bag and a brief biography. Here are pictures of the display

Larry Evans, a northern historian, and columnist has written an interesting article about Anne Young and other nurses that served in the Peace River district. Go here to learn more.

Old Hastings Mill Store Museum Opens

 

Survivors of Vancouver’s great fire of 1886 took refuge in Hasting’s Mill Store. The building survived the fire and exists today as the Old Hasting’s Mill Store Museum, Vancouver’s oldest building.

Emily Patterson, Vancouver’s pioneer first nurse, is believed to have shopped in the store when it was located on the waterfront. Although not formally trained, Emily took it upon herself to provide medical treatment to her family and community out of sheer necessity.  She became so adept at her skills that she was thought of as a nurse and was widely respected among Indigenous and pioneer residents up and down Burrard Inlet.

Noted author Lisa Anne Smith’s book: Emily Patterson the Heroic Life of a Milltown Nurse, chronicles the life of this remarkable woman and can be purchased at the Museum. The author kindly donates some of the royalties to the BCHN Society.

A recent successful Go Fund Me campaign raised the needed money to complete essential building updates and repairs. Donations will always be greatly appreciated as work on preserving this heritage building continues.

The Museum will open July 1 for a shortened summer season.

Opera tells the story of HMHS Llandovery Castle

The HMHS Llandovery Castle was one of five Canadian military hospital ships during the First World War. It was hit by a torpedo from a German submarine off the coast of Ireland on June 27, 1918. Of the 234 people who died, 14 were Canadian nurses.

The story of the nurses who died aboard that boat is told in a world premiere opera performed at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo in March 2020.

To learn more about the making of the opera click here: Opera Tells the story of HMHS Llandovery Castle

You can also view the production on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/zV3RDHrgkBA

 

Helen Mussallem’s WW2 nursing uniform on display

Maple Ridge Museum and Community Archives

Lynette Harper, a niece of Dr. Helen Mussallem, recently contacted us to let us know that one of her aunt’s WW2 nursing uniforms was on display at the Maple Ridge Museum and Community Archives.

The Museum’s curator (Shea Henry) shared pictures of the displayed uniform and the accompanying mini biography.

Dr. Mussallem is Canada’s most decorated and beloved nursing leader who had a special place in her heart for the history of nursing. She is one of our esteemed Honourary Members and supported the BC History of Nursing Society since its inception.

 

CBC News reports on Nova Scotia History of Nursing Group

Gloria Stephens, a former BCHNS member left BC a few years back and established the Nova Scotia History of Nursing Group. She was recently interviewed by the CBC Atlantic News that featured the group’s archives located at the former Victoria General Hospital School of Nursing in Halifax.  Good job Gloria!!!

To see the interview go to https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/victorial-general-school-of-nursing-alumni-keeping-the-memory-alive-1.5477444

 

WHO Declares 2020 the Year of the Nurse and the Midwife

The role of nursing and midwifery has been recognized by the World Health Organization as they designate 2020 “The Year of the Nurse and the Midwife” in honor of Florence Nightingale’s 200th birthday. The designation comes with a push for expansion: “the world needs 9 million more nurses and midwives if it is to achieve universal health coverage by 2030,” a statement on their website reads.

For further information visit WHO Declares 2020 the Year of the Nurse and the Midwife